Take the 2014 Kids Nation SurveyWe want to hear from South Africa's parents! Complete the survey and you could win R1000 in cash or a R500 online voucher!
 
Is organic best for kids?Organic food benefits not only your body, but your family's bodies and the rest of the world.
 
Search

Your baby: Week 9

 

Pic: iStockphoto.com

Article originally in Parent24

What's the baby up to?

Growth points

Say the word

Speech and language development starts in the womb where your unborn baby hears your voice and everyday sounds around your home. After birth your baby will recognise your voice and prefer it to any other voice. Babies learn language through frequent interaction when you talk to him and read him stories. Newborns prefer high-pitched and slower speech. An interesting fact is that most mothers instinctively speak this way to their newborns and as they grow older adapt to a more normal speech pattern.

Help your baby’s language growth:

• Talk to your baby as much as possible when she's awake.
• Look into her eyes and chat to her about what you are doing, what she is doing, and what is going on in the world around her.
• Use common, everyday words over and over, and point to objects as you name them.
• Start as early as now to read your baby bedtime stories. Your baby loves to hear your voice since it both soothes and stimulates her.

Take care of you...

The baby's fine, how are you?

Caring for a new baby is hard, unrelenting work. No matter how well prepared you are or how much you looked forward to the arrival of your baby, you will find it difficult at times. You will probably experience a wide range of feelings, from joy and excitement to frustration, resentment, guilt and worry. This is quite normal and you will need help, support and understanding from the people around you.

Sometimes, however, these unhappy feelings become so intense that you feel overwhelmed and out of control. If this happens, you may be suffering from Post Natal Depression (PND) and you should contact your doctor as soon as possible.

The symptoms to look out for include:

• No enjoyment of life or activities
• Feeling guilty
• Not caring about your baby
• Periods of panic or anxiety
• Overly concerned about the health of the baby
• Not sleeping or being unable to go back to sleep
• Feeling constantly miserable and sad
• Feeling lethargic and not wanting to do anything or go anywhere
• Extreme mood swings from tearful to angry to remorseful
• Extreme irritability with your baby

... and think about

Is that mark permanent?

There are a variety of birthmarks, some small and insignificant while others are very visible. These skin lesions are either vascular (from blood vessels) or pigmented. Vascular birthmarks occur when blood vessels overgrow and produce a raised or flat red, purple or blue mark.
Examples are:

• Port wine stain – a dark red/purple patch which can be small or large and appear anywhere on the body. This often expands and get darker as the child gets older.
• Stork bite – red, mottled spots usually on the back of the neck, if they are on the forehead or eyelids they are known as angel kisses. They usually fade within 6 months.
• A pigmented birthmark occurs through a skin abnormality that produces melanin. These include:
• Mongolian blue spot – a pale blue/black patch resembling a bruise that is found on the lower back or on the shoulder. They usually disappear with time.
• Café-au-lait spot – a brown patch that can be found anywhere on the body. They are usually permanent and could expand.
• Moles – can be flat, raised or hairy and found anywhere on the body.

If a mark is in an obvious place or otherwise worries you, talk to your doctor about it at your baby’s next check-up. It may be removable at a later stage, or be nothing to worry about.  
 
Go back to the complete list of Baby week-by-week updates.

Read more on: behaviour  |  development  |  baby
NEXT ON PARENT24X

Your baby: Week 10

2010-11-18 13:20

Read Parent24’s Comments Policy

24.com publishes all comments posted on articles provided that they adhere to our Comments Policy. Should you wish to report a comment for editorial review, please do so by clicking the 'Report Comment' button to the right of each comment.

Comment on this story
0 comments
Add your comment
Comment 0 characters remaining
 
 
There are new stories on the homepage. Click here to see them.