Take the 2014 Kids Nation SurveyWe want to hear from South Africa's parents! Complete the survey and you could win R1000 in cash or a R500 online voucher!
 
Parents speak out!The Parent24 forums are the perfect place to vent, share or ask a question.
 
Search

What pill should every woman take?

 
If you’ve got ovaries, read on and find out what you could be missing.
legumes on a spoon
By Nechama Brodie

Pic: Shutterstock

Around 18 months ago I was researching a story on genetic disorders [for an article later published in Women’s Health]. One of the experts I spoke to was Tina-Marié Wessels, a genetic counsellor at the Wits University’s Human Genetics division.

After I’d asked her to explain some of the more complicated bits, I asked Tina-Marié one of my standard “clever questions for specialists”, which was pretty much along the lines of “if there was one thing you could do to [improve your health / avoid getting ill / etc] what would it be?”
Tina-Marié’s answer startled me: she said that the one thing every woman of childbearing age can and should do is take folate – even if you weren’t planning on having kids (keeping in mind that nearly half of all pregnancies are unplanned).

Why folate?

“Folate reduces the risk of neural tube defects and cleft lips and palates during pregnancy,” she said. “It’s necessary for DNA replication; if you don’t have enough folate, it disrupts embryogenensis. If you’re making eggs, you should be on folate.”

Folate is the naturally occurring form of an essential B-vitamin, which is found in foodstuffs [see list below]. The synthetic version is called Folic Acid. Over the last 15 years, a number of foodstuffs – including bread and breakfast cereals – have been fortified or enriched with folic acid, to compensate for insufficient folate intake in people’s diets.

Your body needs folic acid for cell division and DNA synthesis – particularly during early pregnancy, when those things happen pretty rapidly.

Tina-Marié’s advice isn’t new, or even radical. It’s a message healthcare providers and government health services have been openly promoting for years. But we’re patently not listening. Studies have shown that less than 40% of all women regularly take folic acid – I was one of them: I only took folic acid supplements after I found out I was pregnant with both my kids.

Physicians advise taking folic acid for at least a month before conception, and three months after, to reduce the risks of neural tube defects.

I recently met an older woman who was trying to conceive for the first time, and who was already consulting with fertility specialists – none of whom had yet suggested to her that she prepare for possible pregnancy by taking a folic acid supplement.  
I gave her a short, friendly lecture and a big hug of encouragement. The next day I went off to my own pharmacy and got my own little jar of essential vitamins.

How much do you need?


The recommended daily dose for women “of childbearing age” is 400mcg of folic acid per day, taken through food and supplements. [FYI: even if you’re not a woman, you should be getting the same amount of folic acid – the vitamin has numerous health and fertility benefits for men]. If your family has a history of neural tube defects this amount may be increased – but this needs to be done in consultation with a specialist, as too much can be just as damaging as too little. Your pharmacy or health shop will stock plain folic acid; it’s also contained in most pregnancy multi-vitamin supplements.   

Foods that are naturally rich in folate include leafy greens – spinach, kale, even lettuce – brussel sprouts, broccoli, asparagus, avocado, and legumes (beans). Foods that are enriched or fortified with folic acid may contribute as much as 190mcg of folic acid a day, but this is still not enough to reach your RDA.

Need to know: Smoking, alcohol consumption and stress can all interfere with your body’s folate levels. Studies have also shown that certain medication – including aspirin, birth control pills, anti-inflammatories and cholesterol-lowering meds – can also deplete folic acid. 

Disclaimer: The views of columnists published on Parent24 are their own and therefore do not necessarily represent the views of Parent24.

Have you asked your doctor about your pre-pregnancy health?

NEXT ON PARENT24X

Gay baby daddy

2014-01-14 15:21

Read Parent24’s Comments Policy

24.com publishes all comments posted on articles provided that they adhere to our Comments Policy. Should you wish to report a comment for editorial review, please do so by clicking the 'Report Comment' button to the right of each comment.

Comment on this story
2 comments
Add your comment
Comment 0 characters remaining
 
 
There are new stories on the homepage. Click here to see them.