The deadly filth that could be lurking in your birthing pool!
Things you don't think about when relaxed in your birthing pool.
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Most of the time we hear about the benefits of water birthing, but seldom do we hear about the dangers or what could possibly go wrong.

The wonders of giving birth in water

We all know that being in water is a form of relaxation and, for pregnant women whose muscles are tensed up, being in water before you give birth or during the process can be exceptionally helpful.

It helps the mother relax better and makes the whole birthing experience easier and calmer. In a birthing pool, you are more likely to take deeper breaths making the breathing process easier and more natural rather than taking short breaths that increase the pain during contractions.

What makes it a better experience for babies is that they are born in almost the same temperature water that they have been swimming in for the time that they've spent inside of your uterus. But of course we can’t ultimately say what the feeling is like for a baby when they are born.

What people also like to believe is that a baby who is born in water is much calmer and cries less than a baby who is born in air.

The risks of giving birth in water- the following risks are taken from Today Health.

These risks and guidelines are the first guidelines from the AAP- American Academy of Paediatrics as well as the American College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists to offer professional advice on a well-known subject.

  • The first breath- a baby doesn't take their first breath until all nerves in face, mouth and nose has come in to contact with air or change in temperature. But if they so do take their first breath under water, the risk of them obtaining an infection from the contaminated water- the water contains faecal matter and amniotic fluid.
  • There is also a chance of your baby drowning after aspirating.
  • Removal from water to air- the difference between the temperatures may cause the baby’s body to go into shock when being removed from the water.
  • The chance of the umbilical cord breaking up is also one to think about.

Be advised that these are all possible risks; if you choose to have a water birth these may not will happen to you. Always consult with a healthcare professional before finalising your birth plan.

What was your water birth experience like?

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