10 weeks pregnant? Things to know
Read more about your ongoing doctor’s visits, Medical aid, RH incompatibility, illness and pregnancy.
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Ongoing doctor’s visits:

Your next appointment will be much shorter than your first antenatal appointment.

You can pretty much expect your doctor or midwife to routinely check the following at every appointment:

  1. Examination of your abdomen to feel the top of your uterus.
  2. Growth of your baby – size and weight
  3. Foetal heart rate
  4. Your weight and blood pressure check
  5. A urine test for sugar, protein and signs of infection
  6. Examination for swelling or fluid retention
  7. Haemoglobin and hematocrit check for anaemia.

At this stage of your pregnancy your visits to the doctor are monthly. From week 28, the beginning of your third trimester, your visits will be every second week and from week 36 onwards you will schedule weekly visits to see your doctor.

Pregnant? We compare 27 medical aid plans for you

Medical aid

  • If you have a medical aid, get a copy of your benefit guide and double-check your benefits for antenatal visits, ultrasounds (scans) and delivery.
  • Some medical aids require that you register your pregnancy and with most medical aids these days you get a Gift pack.
  • If you don’t have a medical aid, consult a medical aid brokerage.
  • Also ask your doctor to give you a quote on the total cost of your antenatal visits, scans and delivery to ensure that you are prepared and not surprised with any extra expenses.

RH incompatibility

What is RH incompatibility?

  • The Rhesus, or Rh factor is a substance found on the surface of red blood cells.
  • If your blood contains Rh0 (D) molecules, you are considered to be Rh-positive, otherwise as Rh-negative if it is absent.

Why is it a risk?

  • Rh incompatibility develops when the mother, having a Rh–negative blood type and the father, having a Rh-positive blood type produce a fetus whose blood type is Rh-positive.
  • The Rh-positive blood cells from the fetus could pass into the mother’s bloodstream during pregnancy or at birth, where they would be recognised as a foreign substance, in which case, the mother will produce antibodies against the fetus' blood.
  • If this is the mother’s first pregnancy, she will have little or few of these antibodies and they will be unlikely to affect the fetus, however, there will be a strong chance that future Rh-positive fetus’ will be harmed if the mother is not treated accordingly.
  • The result for the fetus may be jaundice, heart failure, anaemia or even brain damage.

Treatment

  • The Rh-negative mother’s blood should be checked every 2 months for these antibodies, especially after any activity which may cause the mother’s and foetus’ blood to mix, such as after amniocentesis or Chorionic Villus Sampling (CVS), and within the first 72 hours after delivery.
  • At these times, the mother should be given a Rh0(D) immune-globulin injection to destroy these antibodies if they exist.
  • This injection is also necessary, should the pregnancy be terminated through an abortion or miscarriage.

Read: Rhesus: Positive or negative?

Illness and pregnancy

In general, coughs and colds are not dangerous conditions. They might be annoying and make you feel awful, but neither presents a real risk to your health or the health of your baby. Consult your doctor before taking over the counter medication to relief symptoms.

When to worry?

  • If you feel that your symptoms get worse after a few days and you are experiencing fever you might have a secondary infection like bronchitis which has to be treated immediately.
  • Sinus infections are relatively common in pregnancy because of the increased nasal congestion – antibiotic treatment is often necessary to prevent secondary infections.
  • If you are an asthma sufferer you should pay special attention to how you feel and consult your doctor if you experience difficulty in breathing.

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