The first Iron Girl in Britain
A girl born without a hand has the opportunity to do things she previously couldn't, thanks to a 3D printer.
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A self-conscious little girl has become the recipient of a fantastic invention for little ones who have disabilities.

A couple from Britain were given distressing news about five years ago when they were told their daughter would be born with only one hand. The couple’s daughter, Hayley, was born with symbrachydactyly. This is a congenital abnormality which left her being born with only a stump instead of fingers. 

According to MailOnline they feared that her disability would cast a shadow over her life.
When their daughter turned five years old and started school they noticed that she was self conscious. She would stand with her one hand in front of the other when posing for photos and also that she would stand with her arm behind her back out of habit.

All this changed recently when she became the first child in Britain to receive a prosthetic hand made on a 3D printer. 

Just like Iron Man, the hand looks robotic. The prosthesis helps her with things she previously wasn’t able to do, like peel a banana and paint her nails. 

Children are able to pick their own colours and designs for the prosthetic is to ensure that they feel special rather than embarrassed.

They discovered the non-profit group E-Nable which then referred them to University of Wisconsin engineer Frankie Flood.

After making a plaster cast of their child’s hand it was sent to Professor Flood; six weeks later, after printing the results on a 3D printer, he posted the pink and purple bionic arm.

E-Nable has made about 40 super-hero style hands since they formed a year ago. The device works simply being controlled by the wrist and wiring. They come in different styles like claws and some have flashing lights. 




If your kid was born with this kind of disability, would you consider this prosthesis?
 

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