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How to act in a hijacking

 
If the worst happens, here’s how to give your family the best chance.
By Léanda C. Retief

Pic: iStockphoto.com

Article originally in Parent24
The experts from the National Hijack Prevention Agency (NHPA) gives the following things to remember during a hijacking:
  1. ALWAYS remember that no car or possession is more important then you or your families’ lives. Cars and possessions can be replaced, lives cannot.
  2. Under NO circumstances lose your temper, argue, threaten or challenge the hijackers. They are nervous to start with, so if you upset them, they might retaliate and hurt you or your family.
  3. When you are approached by a hijacker, put your hands up. The perpetrators need to see your hands so they do not feel threatened.
  4. Do not make eye contact. This makes the hijackers nervous because they think that you can identify them later.
  5. Try to observe as many things that you can without looking directly at the hijacker. It can be useful when you have to describe them to the police later.
  6. If you have a baby in a car seat, get out of the vehicle. Keep your eyes averted and tell the hijackers that you are going to take your baby out of the car. It would probably be the most difficult thing you will ever do, but under no circumstances panic or scream at the hijackers. Do not make any sudden or unexpected movements, just move towards the door calmly and open it. Take your baby out and move away from the car as soon as possible.
  7. Young children must exit the vehicle with you on the same side and through the same door. Do not get separated. Move away from the car as soon as possible.Older children may exit the vehicle on their own. It is important for you to tell them to stay calm and not argue or shout.

There are no rules as to how you must react during a carjacking. It is probably more sensible to respond to your instincts and the events as they unfold. No situation or criminal is the same, no criminal’s mood or reaction is the same. It is best to be alert at all times and trust yourself to respond to the circumstances the best you can.

Things you might (or might not) know about hijackings:

A spokesperson for Tracker said that South Africans has a culture of people driving cars they are not able to maintain, so they buy parts on the black market – fuelling thefts and hijackings to supply to this market.
  • The cars most popular to hijack are Toyota, Volkswagen, BMW and the Nissan 1400 bakkie.
  • Only 15% of licences cars in South Africa has tracking devices.
  • Most cars are stolen for their parts and dismantled quite quickly after the theft, but many cars are also stolen “on order” from clients.
  • The days of the week that most hijackings occur are Fridays and Tuesdays.
  • The time of the day most hijackings occur are between 16:00 and 20:00 and 04:00 and 08:00
  • The weapon of choice for most hijackers are firearms.
  • Gauteng and Kwazulu-Natal has the most incidents of hijackings each year.

Have you been carjacked? What did you do?
 

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