Parents protest ‘radical’ sex education
Canada: thousands take to the streets to reject a new 'explicit' sex education curriculum.
(Youtube)
Source

Toronto: A controversial sex education programme which was previously shelved in 2010 is now back on the cards, but some parents have slammed sections of the programme as inappropriate and way too explicit for kids, according to campaignlife.

Premier Kathleen Wynne’s liberal government has gone forward with the changes to the curriculum which had last been updated in 1998 in order to better inform children about their bodies and certain situational issues they may face when it comes to sex.

Read more:

School sex act backfires

Don't avoid the sex talk

Parents talk to their kids about sex for the first time

Watch: march against sex education via Now Magazine/YouTube:


"How to masturbate" classes?

What’s worrying some parents is the content which will be taught to their kids and at what age: according to the Huffington Post, the curriculum includes Grade 3s being taught about homosexuality and same-sex marriage, Grade 6s hearing about puberty and masturbation and Grade 7s discussing issues around STDs as well as discussions about oral and anal sex.

The premier insists that the old curriculum is “dangerously” out of date and has stated that representatives from the school council bodies agreed that parents wanted their children to have access to correct information.

In SA, children are taught given sex education as part of Life Orientation classes, according to The Conversation. It is reported that researchers are concerned that the sex education classes in their current state do not cover enough and place too heavy an emphasis on abstinence.

As Health24 has pointed out, though, in a country like South Africa parents should also shoulder the responsibility of discussing sex education points with their children, and not rely too heavily on school classes for this. Parents should have open conversations with their kids, that they offer the facts and encourage the child to ask questions. Age-appropriate answers should be given, so a child of five would get a different answer to a 16-year-old child.

Do you think some sex-ed topics are inappropriate for the classroom?

Read Parent24’s Comments Policy

24.com publishes all comments posted on articles provided that they adhere to our Comments Policy. Should you wish to report a comment for editorial review, please do so by clicking the 'Report Comment' button to the right of each comment.

Comment on this story
8 comments
Comments have been closed for this article.
NEXT ON PARENT24
Help! I was cyber bullied!
 

week-by-week

Want to know what your baby looks like and what you can expect at this stage?

 
 
 

Directories

Everything from parties to pre-schools in your area.