Your teen's brain could predict pop hits
Teen brain activity, recorded while they're listening to new songs, could predict the popularity of the songs.
According to ScienceDaily, an Emory University study suggests that the brain activity of teens, recorded while they are listening to new songs, may help predict the popularity of the songs.

The study

120 songs from MySpace pages were chosen. The musicians were relatively unknown and none of them had recording contracts. After the songs were chosen, 27 teens (ages 12 - 17) listened to the selected songs while their neural reactions were recorded through functional magnetic resolution imaging (fMRI). The subjects were also asked to rate each song on a scale of one to five.

Gregory Berns, a neuroeconomist, was watching American Idol a while after the study when he heard one of the songs that had been used in the study. It was a hit.

"It's not quite a hit predictor," Berns cautions, "but we did find a significant correlation between the brain responses in this group of adolescents and the number of songs that were ultimately sold."

Read more about kids and music:
'Shut that music off!'
Music for your premmie?
Miley Cyrus's raunchy video

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