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Paid to view porn

 
This woman’s job is to track down child sexual abuse and report it.
By Scott Dunlop

Pic: Shutterstock

Article originally in Parent24
There are plenty of news stories about paedophiles, perverts and other abusers being caught with pornographic images and videos depicting children in the most shocking, degrading acts, but most of us would never come across such material. It takes special skill to know where to look and how to help identify individuals, locations and more clues in order to expose those responsible for putting that content online. That’s where Internet Watch Foundation comes in, according to the Mail Online.

Internet sleuth


In a recent interview with “Sally”, the Mail describes how she, as part of a small team, spends her days searching for these details in images of child sexual abuse.

The footage is shot in very ordinary surroundings, and items such as book titles, home décor and ornaments and posters or paintings on walls may all lead to the arrest of the producers of the material.

The British foundation has reportedly already managed to remove over 100 000 pages from the internet successfully, and has passed on loads of relevant tips to the police. Reported pages from the public provide many of the leads in removing offensive pages.

Of particular relevance to parents is what Sally termed an “explosion” of self-generated pornographic or sexualised imagery of teens and younger children online, a result of kids uploading these pictures to various sites. These sites are then trawled by paedophiles and the images circulated on other pages and sites.

The danger isn’t just that these images may be circulated, but that child abusers may use them to bully kids or even coerce them into real-life sexual activities by grooming them.

Once a sexual/pornographic/explicit image has gone onto the internet, it may be almost impossible to remove, as it can be shared across various platforms.

Sally’s job entails viewing perhaps 170 images per day- all of them horrific and some even involving the sexual abuse of babies. She reports the page to the internet service provider in the UK (provided the page has a local server) which will remove the image within an hour.

What about local pages and sites?


In SA, the best place to report child sexual abuse (or images of it) remains SAPS, the police service. Their role is largely to deal with the aftermath of child sexual abuse rather than act in prevention of it.

According to Child Line:
  • One in four children in South Africa will be abused some time during their childhood.
  • Just as many boys as girls under the age of 10 years are sexually abused. 
  • 80% of the offenders of sexual abuse are well known to, and trusted by, the child i.e. a family member, neighbour, teacher, parent, caretaker, parent’s friend. 
  • Sexual abuse usually happens in a familiar environment where the offender has complete control i.e. his car, classroom etc. 
  • In South Africa, there has been a significant increase in young people (under 18 years) sexually abusing children. 
  • 99% of the perpetrators of sexual abuse are men.
Via ChildLine

Here are some more resources should you need to report child sexual abuse:

Child abuse at home
Child abuse: You can help

  • Do ensure that your child is aware of the risks involved in uploading images to the internet, and ensure that you have the relevant filters/protective measures on your computers, tablets and smart phones.
  • Do not go looking for images of child sexual abuse, as having these in your possession or sharing them is a crime.
Do your devices all have some form of protective measures on them?
Read more on: pornography  |  child abuse
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