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Social recruitment – it’s who knows YOU

 
Help your teen discover the latest trends in job seeking and how to get started.
Opinion piece: Greg Schneider

Pic: Shutterstock

In the last 10 years the world has changed dramatically. The world in which your children live and will work is expected to be significantly different from the world you (or I) grew up with. In today’s highly connected, networked and socially active world - where information is just a click away – it’s more about who you know than what you know. 

Crowdsourced solutions

In research conducted in 2012 Right Management found that 44% of individuals believe that it’s “who you know” that will get you ahead in your organisation (compared to 39% who thought it was “job performance”). While this applies within the organisation there is now a new wave of crowdsourced solutions that look to apply the same thinking to the recruitment process.

Social Recruitment is the practice of empowering individuals to refer their friends, colleagues and other social contacts for positions at potential employers. Successful applicants and their referrer earn a financial and social benefit from the referral. This is a very new field and South African startup Hiring Bounty is leading the charge as the industry matures.

As it stands between 60 and 80% of jobs are found through personal relationships. Social recruitment looks to formalise this referral process in order to decrease the need for traditional recruitment agencies and rather provide a mechanism for friends and family to proactively assist trusted individuals to find their perfect job (and for the employer to find the perfect employee).

Looking at the individual as a whole

Social recruitment believes that not everybody is right for every job (even if they have the degree that says that are capable). Increasingly hires are being made not only on the individuals’ formal education but rather on their beliefs and how well it matches the culture of the business and its people.

With the proliferation of the internet a number of changes have taken place, among these is the fragmentation of the job market. Job titles such as “data architect”, “growth hacker” and hundreds of other new job titles fill business cards around the world. In fact, it has been asserted that the top 10 in-demand jobs didn’t exist just 5 years ago. By extension, we’re teaching our children skills for a world which would have moved on by the time they graduate. A terrifying thought!

More complicating still is that the job titles of these positions are simply specialisations on existing job descriptions. Marketing, for example, now has the specialisation of “growth hacking” (the process of rapidly growing a new business). For the general graduate this is unknown yet, through the network effect of social recruitment, it has become possible to rely on the combined knowledge of your network to help identify the perfect business for an individual’s specific interests, needs, beliefs,  aspirations and wants.

It’s not what you know. It’s not even who you know. It’s really all about who knows you.

Greg Schneider is MD of Hiring Bounty (@hiringbounty on Twitter). While heading up new business in Cape Town for ORM company BrandsEye, he was exposed to the power of social conversation. Identifying the value there, he launched Hiring Bounty, a business that formalises social recruitment by offering a platform to crowdsource the process. Email Greg at greg.schneider@hiringbounty.com, follow @greg_dale on Twitter

Disclaimer: The views of columnists published on Parent24 are their own and therefore do not necessarily represent the views of Parent24.

Does your teen have a network which could lead to professional connections?

Read more on: school  |  careers  |  recruitment  |  parenting
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