Google has a free course teaching kids to spot fake news, and you should probably try it too
Be Internet Awesome is a free digital safety and citizenship children's course Google has been offering for the past two years. They've now added spotting fake news to the curriculum and tech experts are saying the course may prove just as beneficial to adults as well.
"Kids today need a guide to the internet and media just as they need instruction on other topics. " (iStock)
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If you haven't already been turned on to phishing attacks, bots, fake URLs and disinformation, then you may find Google's Be Internet Awesome course useful. 

The free course is actually meant for children aged 7 to 12, but according to TechCrunch.com, the course works just as well for adults too. 


Also see: Technology can help kids learn, but only if parents and teachers are involved

Considering that the World Health Organisation has proposed a 1 hour limit on screen time for children under 5, at what age do you think children should start being tech-savvy?  Share your opinion with us, and we could publish your email. If you want to stay anonymous, let us know. 


Since life is becoming more and more digitally dependent, it makes sense for kids to be learning about these tricky topics early on, plus have you seen what AI's look like these days? (Watch the video above to see just how realistic the tech is becoming)

Spotting the difference between the real and the fake is getting harder and harder. 

The course works by teaching concepts simply and then helps children put those concepts into practice by completing different exercises, including an online game designed for spotting fake news and websites.

How to distinguish a conversation with a bot from a conversation with an actual human being is also included (yes, it's come to that now). 

"Kids today need a guide to the internet and media just as they need instruction on other topics. We need help teaching them about credible sources, the power of words and images... Let’s not only teach kids, but also inspire, educate and empower families to make tech work better for them as well," commented educator and Teachmama.com founder, Amy Mascott via the Google blog

Find an in-depth descriptive outlay of the course here

The free course is available here

Chat back:

Considering that the World Health Organisation has proposed a 1 hour limit on screen time for children under 5, at what age do you think children should start being tech-savvy?  Share your opinion with us, and we could publish your email. If you want to stay anonymous, let us know. 

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