The parenting styles Harry and Meghan might settle on for raising their son
Positive, Attachment, Free Range or RIE? Now that baby watch is over its time for the parenting style predictions to begin. Here are our top picks for the approach to parenting the Duke and Duchess might be considering.
Prince Harry, Duke of Sussex and Meghan, Duchess of Sussex, pose with their newborn son Archie Harrison. (Getty Images)
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They're no run-of-the-mill royal couple, and they've never pretended to be. 

The unique path they've carved for themselves in a family steeped in century-old tradition have set Harry and Meghan apart from what we've come to expect from the royal family

And now that they've become parents, we're sure to see them taking a similar approach to parenting

Last week, the world caught its first glimpse of Archie Harrison Mountbatten-Windsor, held not by mom but by dad, being protectively caressed by his attentive mother.

If the brief but ever so sweet introduction of their newborn is any indication, we're sure to see the Duke and Duchess adopting some pretty unique parenting styles. 

Here's a look at the styles we think the couple will take on board. 


Also see: Princess Diana was the lowkey baby name inspiration for Harry and Meghan's newborn son

Which of the below parenting styles do you think Harry and Meghan are most likely to adopt? Tell us your opinion and we may publish your mail.


The Royals and the RIE 

Resources for Infant Educarers or RIE was first developed in 1978 by early childhood development specialist, Magda Gerber, and advocates a respect based approach to child-rearing. 

In What is this parenting style called RIE? we explore this particular style in full and found that it requires "parents to trust in their baby’s inherent abilities, to allow the child to learn at their own pace, to handle their feelings and to become self-reliant and self-confident at an early age." 

Putting themselves in their babies shoes is also a big part of this style, as parents are encouraged to communicate without baby talk, and to think of their babies not as passive recipients, but rather as active participants. 

This style is definitely more modern and progressive and just up the Sussex family lane.


Also see: From tiger to free-range parents – what research says about pros and cons of popular parenting styles


Move over Daniel Craig, baby wearing isn't your thing anymore 

Harry looked ever the proud papa as he carried baby Archie towards the cameras for his big debut. Something about that moment tells us Harry and Meghan may already have adopted Attachment parenting as their go-to. 

This approach is also known as Gentle parenting (aka Crunchy parenting, so nicknamed for their love of muesli and all things raw). 

The practice originated in the 1950s and is based on Attachment theory, a term used in developmental psychology, which, according to education specialist Rebecca English, "suggests that children who develop strong bonds with parents/caregivers in the early years will have happier, healthier relationships as they age."  

And since she's a firm believer in all things natural, will we see the Duchess opting for cloth nappies? Eco-friendly nappies are favoured among Crunchies, and the style also supports breastfeeding, bed-sharing and baby-wearing, commonly referred to as the three B’s of attachment parenting.

Given their penchant for breaking from tradition, we can easily picture Harry wearing his baby à la Daniel Craig and Meghan normalising public breastfeeding (can you imagine?). 

Not so Sussex

Free range and iron fist parenting are two opposing styles that we just don't see Harry and Meghan bothering with. Here's a little detail on the parenting approachs the new parents might not be keen on. 


Also see: Toxic parenting styles we're leaving with our parents

Freestyling at Frogmore

It might not be the style they'll be adopting for public events, but perhaps at home Harry and Meghan will be inclined to allow little Archie free rein of Frogmore Cottage? 

As the name suggests, this style encourages parents to allow children the freedom to learn and experience life with as little parental input (as far as is safe) as possible. 

Free-range parenting aims to equip children with a healthy take on mistakes, resilience and responsibility, and makes for contented adults, however, it has also been criticised for being "unsafe and dangerous."

Perhaps best in closely monitored moderation? 


Also see: Your overprotective parenting could be harming your kids

Do as I say: Authoritarian Parenting

It's the parenting style that existed before parenting styles was a thing, and what many an adult today knows as classic child-rearing. 

According to Verywellmind.com, children raised by authoritarian parents grow up with a lot of high expectations and "very little in the way of feedback and nurturance. Mistakes tend to be punished harshly. When feedback does occur, it is often negative." 

Although his great-gran is seen as the picture of authority, we doubt Archie's parents will be too heavy-handed on this old school style. 

Chat back:

Which parenting style do you think Harry and Meghan are most likely to adopt? Tell us your opinion and we may publish your mail.

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