Matric past exam papers Matrics exams 2018!
"It just tastes nicer": 3D printed school dinners?
It's as cool as it sounds. The UK's Big Bang Fair is using amazing gadgets to wow kids into taking an interest in science, technology, engineering and maths (STEM) careers.
Mechanical cogs for supper anyone? (iStock)
Source

Mechanical cogs, exoskeletons and scales aren't regular meal options for learners, but it's these and other mind-boggling inventions that creators behind the UK's Big Bang Fair (BBF) are using to inspire kids to take an interest in science, technology, engineering and maths (STEM) careers. 

"3D printing is just one example of the amazing things you can do in science, technology, engineering and maths, and the Big Bang Fair is all about that; bringing classroom learning to life," explains Tamzin Caffrey, the BBF's Head of Communications. 


What abstract mathematical concept does your child struggle with the most? Tell us by emailing to chatback@parent24.com and we could create a video with a simplified explanation. 


The brainchild of non-profit, EngineeringUK, the BBF is held annually in March and uses competitions, exhibitions and workshops to get kids to see maths and science less as abstract concepts and more like gateways to an exciting career. 

The BBF also coordinates visits to schools throughout the year, sharing a special gadget with the learners at St Helen's Primary School in London. 

For a week, the kids were treated to 3D printed school dinners, with the menu including cauliflower purée shaped into mechanical cogs, hummus and guacamole lizards and three-dimensional broccoli stars aka space broccoli. 

"A lot of the jobs these kids will be doing in the future don't even exist yet. So it's really about giving them an idea of where the subjects they like and the things they learn at school could lead them in the future," said Tamzin. 

And the kids were definitely impressed, with one teen mentioning that the food just tasted better in 3D. 

The upcoming Big Bang Fair will be hosted next year in Birmingham, England. 

What abstract mathematical concept does your child struggle with the most? Tell us by emailing to chatback@parent24.com and we could create a video with a simplified explanation. 

Read more: 

Sign up for our weekly newsletter to receive Parent24 stories directly to your inbox.  

Read Parent24’s Comments Policy
NEXT ON PARENT24X
 
 
 
 
Directories

Everything from parties to pre-schools in your area.